How to stop your kids from interrupting

By | April 16, 2012 | Motherhood & Family

How to stop your kids from interrupting
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“Mom…Mom…Mom…Mom…” Do you ever hear this coming from your kids while you are in the middle of a conversation with someone else?  Have you ever responded by turning and yelling, “WHAT!” and then felt just a little embarrassed (or maybe not) for yourself or for your kids’ rude behavior?

Would you like a simple technique that will make you look the kind of parent who has it all put together? The technique is called “squeeze my fingers” and it can work with kids as young as three.

It only takes a few minutes to teach it to your kids. When things are going well, bring your kid close to you and say, “Sweetie, sometimes you want to talk with me when I am talking with someone else. I know it can be tough to wait until I have finished talking because sometimes I talk for a long time.  I’ll tell you what. The next time I am talking and you need something, rather than interrupting me, just stand next to me and give my fingers a squeeze. I promise to pause my conversation within a few seconds and find out what you need so that you can be on your way. Now let’s practice this a little.”  Then you practice the skill 4 or 5 times until your child gets the hang of it.

If your child forgets and returns to the broken “Mom…Mom…Mom…Mom…” recording, just trigger the signal to him by wiggling your fingers in front of him as you continue with your conversation. When he does reach out be sure to pause your conversation and ask, “What do you need, Sweetie?” in order to reinforce the new learned behavior.

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Shiloh Lundahl

Shiloh Lundahl, LCSW, is a child and family therapist and an independent facilitator of Love and Logic® curricula. He currently teaches parenting classes in Mesa, Arizona and provides in-home therapy and counseling services. Shiloh uses an attachment and a family systems approach to therapy and has specialized training in working with children ages birth through six. Shiloh has three children of his own and he manages the parenting websites ParentArizona.com and ArizonaFamilyInstitute.com.

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